Prion Disease Testing

Prion Disease Testing is a topic covered in the Davis's Lab & Diagnostic Tests.

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Synonym/Acronym:
Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, TSEs.

Rationale
Testing for prion diseases may be considered for patients with undiagnosed, rapidly progressive dementia.

Patient Preparation
There are no activity restrictions unless by medical direction. Follow the food, fluid, or medication instructions indicated in the individual studies.

Normal Findings
Negative biopsy, normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein levels, normal electroencephalogram (EEG), normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), normal neurologic examination.

  • No evidence of prion disease
  • Negative tonsillar biopsy (if variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease [vCJD] is being considered), as vCJD is the only type known to involve the lymph nodes, spleen, tonsil, and appendix. Note: A negative biopsy does not rule out vCJD.

Critical Findings and Potential Interventions
N/A

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Synonym/Acronym:
Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, TSEs.

Rationale
Testing for prion diseases may be considered for patients with undiagnosed, rapidly progressive dementia.

Patient Preparation
There are no activity restrictions unless by medical direction. Follow the food, fluid, or medication instructions indicated in the individual studies.

Normal Findings
Negative biopsy, normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein levels, normal electroencephalogram (EEG), normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), normal neurologic examination.

  • No evidence of prion disease
  • Negative tonsillar biopsy (if variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease [vCJD] is being considered), as vCJD is the only type known to involve the lymph nodes, spleen, tonsil, and appendix. Note: A negative biopsy does not rule out vCJD.

Critical Findings and Potential Interventions
N/A

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