metastasis

metastasis is a topic covered in the Taber's Medical Dictionary.

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(mĕ-tas′tă-sĭs)

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(mĕ-tas′tă-sēz″)
pl. metastases [meta- + stasis]

1. Movement of bacteria or body cells (esp. cancer cells) from one part of the body to another.
2. A change in the location of a disease from one part of the body to another. Diseases (such as cancer) may spread by direct invasion or through body fluids, e.g., the bloodstream, lymphatics, cerebrospinal fluid, or urine.
Descriptive text is not available for this image

METASTASES CT scan of liver (upper left) with round metastatic tumors (Courtesy of Harvey Hatch, MD, urry General Hospital)
The usual application is to the manifestation of a malignancy as a secondary growth arising from the primary growth in a new location. The malignant cells may spread through the lymphatic circulation, the bloodstream, or avenues such as the cerebrospinal fluid.

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(mĕ-tas′tă-sĭs)

To hear audio pronunciation of this topic, purchase a subscription or log in.

(mĕ-tas′tă-sēz″)
pl. metastases [meta- + stasis]

1. Movement of bacteria or body cells (esp. cancer cells) from one part of the body to another.
2. A change in the location of a disease from one part of the body to another. Diseases (such as cancer) may spread by direct invasion or through body fluids, e.g., the bloodstream, lymphatics, cerebrospinal fluid, or urine.
Descriptive text is not available for this image

METASTASES CT scan of liver (upper left) with round metastatic tumors (Courtesy of Harvey Hatch, MD, urry General Hospital)
The usual application is to the manifestation of a malignancy as a secondary growth arising from the primary growth in a new location. The malignant cells may spread through the lymphatic circulation, the bloodstream, or avenues such as the cerebrospinal fluid.

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